“Minicontos Coloridos” by Marcelo Spalding et al.

Screen capture from Minicontos Coloridos 1 by Marcelo Spalding et al. On a white background,the title is "Minicontos Coloridos." "Minicontos" is colored black and "Coloridos" is in multicolor. Smaller text in black follows.
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Minicontos Coloridos  is a collaborative project conceived by Brazilian journalist, writer and teacher Marcelo Spalding in 2013. The short tales are structurally and conceptually associated with colors in a playful way. To access the stories, the reader should mix the primary RGB colors through a pull down menu available on the website in HTML which hosts the tales interface. The website offers three blending options for each of the three primary colors, totaling 27 short tales.

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“Here and There” by Katharine Norman

Screen capture from "Here and There" by Katharine Norman. A clock-shaped interface displaying Roman numerals over a black-and-white computer script. Text: "(three lines too small to read)"
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The image of the clock in Here and There invites the reader to read the texts in order, perhaps starting at 12 o’clock; while at the same time it presents the challenge of breaking the structure and jumping randomly from one number to the other. In doing this, the reader might discover the echo in lines that evoke others or feel the weight of brief pieces that could stand as a single, definitive image. But what looks like a clock is really a chart much larger its scope. The lack of sound in this poem (which contrasts other works by Norman, like “Window“), underlines the vastness of the universe contained in the chart and which is also suggested by the images and the allusions to celestial bodies.

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“Into the Green Green Mud” by Miriam Suzanne

Screen capture of "Into the Green Green Mud" by Miram Suzanne. A cloud of black scribbles forms behind an apparent tree, from which hangs a broken swing. Text: "(too small to read)"
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“Cannibal Dreams” by Lacy Cunningham and Justin Talbott

“Cannibal Dreams” by Lacy Cunningham and Justin Talbott

This elegant hypertext poem consists of 28 links arranged on an excerpt from a book on bone biology. The links are barely distinguishable from the rest of the text, yet lead to poetic language that forms a distinctive contrast to the scientific text in the paragraph. The relation between the two texts isn’t simply tonal counterpoints: they are deeply interconnected, metaphorically and especially thematically. One key to understanding these relations is in the first link, which leads to the image below:

This diagram maps a relationship, showing alternatives paths a couple can take when faced with the kind of situation described in the scientific text. See where the paths lead and you’ll note recurring elements, most of which are not positive for the health of the relationship.

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“In a World Without Electricity” by Alan Bigelow

“How They Brought the News from Paradise” by Alan Bigelow

Screen capture from "How They Brought the News from Paradise" by Alan Bigelow. A dark, stormy night on the open sea where the ships are being violently rocked by the waves, and palm trees and hills can be seen in the far distance. Text: "A skull and crossbones fluttered / over a long, wooden plank / - the bar - / with its beer taps, shot glasses / and alcoholic ballast."
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This narrative poem tells the mock-heroic adventures of an unlikely antihero on an imaginary quest. As Bigelow describes the piece,

In “How They Brought the News from Paradise to Paterson,” a first-person speaker narrates his story (in heroic verse) as he swims from one end of a resort pool complex to another in search of what he thinks is more alcohol, but is in fact a journey to find his marriage
and himself. The poem plays with the epic and tragic within a setting stifled with consumerism and class separation.

The poem is structured as the monomyth, in which the speaker, while lounging at the Paradise pool bar in a 5-star resort in Barbados, overhears what he interprets as a call to adventure: the bar has run out of rum. Taking upon himself to embark upon a journey through the pool complex to find the god-like Concierge at the far end, whose “sage advice / and quick, imperious commands” would restore the flow of rum in Paradise.

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“Last Words” by Alan Bigelow