“Deal With It” Meme by Matt Furie and You

Deal-With-It-Skateboarding-Cat-Gif“Deal with it” is a meme based on a popular phrase or expression that uses image macros and/or animated GIFs as a snarky response when someone else notes disapproval, most frequently used online forums or social networks. This meme is characterized by an image of an iconic person, celebrity, or event, accompanied by the descending of sunglasses upon the subject’s face and revealing a caption which says “Deal with it.”

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“Dois palitos” (Two matchsticks) by Samir Mesquita

Screen capture from “Dois palitos” (Two matchsticks) by Samir Mesquita. Photograph of an open matchbox standing upright on its side, bearing a logo of two burning matches. A larger box bearing the same logo as the matchbox is visible in the background. Text: "dois palitos, Samir Mesquita"
Open “Dois Palitos” by Samir Mesquita

“Two matchsticks” (2008) is the title of an e-poem by short story writer, Samir Mesquita based on “Two matchsticks,” a popular saying in Brazil. The origins of this Brazilian folk expression are difficult to determine, but its significance indicates the rapid execution of a task. The matchbox is a Brazilian’s old friend. Even with the absence of musical instruments several sambas have been created accompanied only by the cadenced rhythm of these improvised little rattles. Today, in the Internet and microblogging age, the matchboxes inspires new literary genres.

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“Mobilestabile” by Ricardo Aleixo

Mobile Stabile by Ricardo Aleixo
“Mobilestabile” by Ricardo Aleixo

Ricardo Aleixo, Brazilian poet, musician and performer is one of those artists who do not fit into labels. Attentive to media art, poetry, music and performance transformations, Aleixo weaves his poetic textures with diverse elements that often converge in the digital media. Openly interested in the poiesis, his eclectic performances are not restricted to poem reading. In these performances poetry, dance, music and multimedia projection go scene with the performer’s body. As such performance presentations are ephemeral and unique, it need to be recorded on video, edited and expanded with the introduction of sound and visual inserts to be published later.

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António Aragão’s “Found Poem” by Rui Torres and Nuno F. Ferreira

Torres__Found Poem_2
Screenshot of “Found Poem” generated from New York Times RSS feed.

In 1964, poets António Aragão (1924-2008) and Herberto Helder launched in Portugal the first number of the “Experimental Poetry Journals“, an experimental poetry magazine that presented vanguard poems created by a generation of poets attentive to new visual poetry tendencies and concrete poetry. 44 years later, a researchers staff headed by Rui Torres launches the project Experimental Poetry: Digital Archive of Portuguese Experimental Literature rescuing and spreading in the digital environment, the published poems and some proposes of its interactive digital versions.

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“@everyword” by Allison Parrish

Screen capture of the "@everyword" twitter account created by Adam Parrish. Text "Twittering every word in the English language. Task will complete in 2013. Tweet 1: skirling. Tweet 2: skirl"
Open “@everyword” by Allison Parrish

This bot has been on deceptively simple mission since it was launched in 2007: it is tweeting the English language, one word every 30 minutes, in alphabetical order. This work of conceptual poetry is delightfully absurd because it claims to be “twittering every word” and even offers a termination date in which such a project would be complete— when even the concept of what constitutes the English language is subject to debate, even if it wasn’t changing on a daily basis. To make such a feat even possible (unless you’re Wowbagger The Infinitely Prolonged) requires setting constraints—such as a choice of dictionary— though it is to Parrish’s credit that she doesn’t disclose the source, because it enhances the project’s conceptual claim.

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“Twitterwurking” by Mez Breeze

Screen capture from “Twitterwurking” by Mez Breeze. White background with various lines of black text written on it. Text: "-Twitterwurking Transcript" "1:go To [to+Doro.thee+Wiicked.White(t{e})ches(s)]. / dop[p]wn.the.ra[bbitten].hole.we.go || twitter_set[tlers,all]." "2. shiver[me.tym(panies)burrs]ing.s[t[l]one arms t.witching granite / blo.od[d?].r[sh]iver.me + t[oxic]all[Ice].tale.u=...." "3. ...=_allIce_[born.of.gra(vity)nite].AllIce mewls+slTl+we[s]igh.ts//all l fLes[ion]h_grAve[L.rashed]. + [user]Pine.like..." "4. i spy_Wh[n]ite.Which_.Sug[l]arings.i aSP+gr[K]oan; u c+ / [+]d[ice]rink.me. up[per+AllIce.Downer].." "5. AllIce.s[epia]tinks: c[sh]aving.bromidal. @if = @then [u:kno:u:want.2]; @u / fade_in+fLip[.out]." "6. i s t [h] u m b l e U p [on] + f l i c k_r_i n g > < o f f . / soniKal[l]i_scr[sandstone_h]atching in_the @keyofnite."
Open “Twitterwurking” by Mez Breeze
This guest performance in the New Media Scotland Twitter account during her residency in July 2008 featured a daily tweet for each day of the month— making a sequence of 31 silky lines mezangelle.

_Twitterwurking_comprised of sequential “tweets” posted via a microblogging platform called Twitter. The work itself was written in my mezangelle language- a type of merging of programming languages/code with poetic elements. The Twitterwurk sought to incorporate specific users into the narrative by typing the “@” symbol before their name. The users were then made aware of this focused reply and thus deliberately enfolded into the tweetstream/project.

“Frequency [Snowball, Doubling]” by Scott Rettberg and the Machine (part 4 of 5)

“Frequency [Terza Rima and Sonnets]” by Scott Rettberg and the Machine (part 3 of 5)

“Frequency [Tanka, Haiku]” by Scott Rettberg and the machine (part 2 of 5)

house is not the same
way different than before
ask them to end it
old men just want it to end
that you will take to the air

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“Frequency” by Scott Rettberg and the machine (part 1 of 5)

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